Hourly vs. Salary Employment Requirements in Ohio

If you are a worker in Ohio, you have the right to be paid fairly for your labor. Fortunately, there are laws regulating what an employer can and cannot ask you to do as well as how much they are required to pay you for your time. Read on to learn about your employment rights in Ohio, whether you are paid hourly or you are a salaried employee.

Hourly Workers in Ohio

The federal minimum wage is $7.25/hour. However, on a state-level, Ohio has a higher minimum wage: $8.55/hour. This means that if your employer is only paying you $7.25/hour, they are complying with federal laws, but not with state laws. You can file a minimum wage/unpaid wages complaint with the Ohio Department of Commerce.

If you work for tips, your employer is required to pay you $4.30/hour. This plus the total amount of tips received in the week must equal at least $8.55 an hour for all hours worked. If it does not, your employer is required to make up the difference.

Ohio also requires employers to pay overtime. This means that for any hours worked in excess of forty hours a week are worth time and a half. For example, if you are usually paid $9/hour, you should receive $13.50/hour for overtime.

Salaried Workers in Ohio

If you are a salaried worker, it means that you are paid a certain amount per year. Most, but not all, salaried workers are exempt. Being exempt means your employer is not required to pay you overtime if you work more than 40 hours in a week. Generally, this is expected, though not legally required, to be offset by a number of paid vacation days and better benefits.

Exempt salary workers can be expected to come in early or state late as necessary to get their work done. However, their time is typically not as closely monitored as hourly workers’.

Have your employment rights been violated?

If you think your employer has broken the law, you can take action to get the pay you deserve. The DeWitt Lae team is here to represent you. We can also help you better understand your situation if you’re not sure whether or not you are being paid as much as the law requires. If you have questions about your pay, we encourage you to contact us right away!

The following two tabs change content below.

DeWitt Law

Michael W. DeWitt is an experienced trial and appellate lawyer who has litigated cases in most Ohio counties and in various federal courts across the country. He has argued appellate matters in Ohio appellate courts, and in the Fourth and Sixth Circuit U.S. Courts of Appeal. After representing corporate clients in employment disputes for over 20 years, Mike now represents employees in harassment, discrimination, retaliation, and restrictive covenant cases and uses the knowledge gained from defending those cases to help clients evaluate and pursue their employment claims. He also represents business clients in breach of contract and other business disputes.

Latest posts by DeWitt Law (see all)

About DeWitt Law

Michael W. DeWitt is an experienced trial and appellate lawyer who has litigated cases in most Ohio counties and in various federal courts across the country. He has argued appellate matters in Ohio appellate courts, and in the Fourth and Sixth Circuit U.S. Courts of Appeal. After representing corporate clients in employment disputes for over 20 years, Mike now represents employees in harassment, discrimination, retaliation, and restrictive covenant cases and uses the knowledge gained from defending those cases to help clients evaluate and pursue their employment claims. He also represents business clients in breach of contract and other business disputes.

%d bloggers like this: